Monthly Archives: August 2016

You know that workout will be help you more healthy

it’s the time of year when millions of people begin exercising to meet their resolution of losing weight or getting healthy. When beginning any exercise program, it’s important to pace yourself and not risk injury by overexerting yourself from the get-go – especially if it’s been a while since you worked out. To prevent that, here are some tips and tricks to get you started on your journey towards a healthier life.

Tip 1: Start Slow

Don’t just jump right in and start exercising five days a week — that’s a recipe for disaster, says John Higgins, MD, Director of Exercise Physiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston. It’s better that you gradually work up to exercising several days per week while you see how your body responds.

“Start low and go slow,” Dr. Higgins said. “The current recommendation is 2-3 days per week, for at least 30 minutes per day. But for someone who is just starting out, we recommend that they start at 1-2 days per week and ramp it up from there.”

Tip 2: Know When to Stretch

Stretching right before a workout may seem like the best thing to do, but you might be putting yourself at risk of injury.

“After you warm up, you should stretch your muscles and hold it for about 15 seconds,” Higgins said. “You are less likely to injure yourself when you’re stretching if your muscles are already a little warmed up.”

Tip 3: Mix it Up

Whether you’re going for weight loss or bulking up, a mixed regimen of aerobic and strength training is the best way to achieve the body you want. But even within those categories, don’t stick to the same exercises every day, Higgins said.

“Don’t go running every day,” he said. “It’ll get boring and you’ll get to a point where you don’t enjoy it anymore. Try biking, or the elliptical or whatever you enjoy most. If you like to play basketball or tennis, do that, because you’re more likely to stick to something you enjoy.”

In addition, move between the four various types of exercise, which are aerobic,resistance (strength) training, flexibility (which includes yoga) and balance, which isespecially important for seniors.

Tip 4: Know Your Weight and the Right Way to Use it

Most people are confused the first time they walk into a gym, Higgins said, but are afraid of asking for advice. But if that’s you — get over it.

“If you don’t know ask,” he said. “By law, gyms have to have people who can help show you how to work out on the machine, and it can save you from badly injuring yourself.”

In addition, many gym newbies go for the heaviest weight they can — a rookie mistake.

“Go on a weight machine and, starting at the lowest weight, pull it down and keep adding on from there. Just keep increasing the weight until you reach a point where you can only do one or you can’t do any. That’s too much”

Once you find your maximum weight, two-thirds of that number is where you should start.

“You should be able to do about 12 reps,” Higgins said. “It should be easy, but it shouldn’t be difficult to the point where you’re straining.”

Finally, once you have a weight you’re comfortable with, don’t get too eager to increase it.

“You should not increase it more than 10 percent in a week,” Higgins said. “If you do, your risk of injury increases exponentially.”

Tip 5: Know When to Take a Break

When people start out, they are often overzealous and try to get to the gym every day, Higgins said. However, by not letting your body rest, you can be doing much more harm than good.

“If you don’t give your body time to heal and repair itself, your performance will go down and you’ll get into a vicious cycle where you never fully recover,” he said.

And if you’re sore after a workout, that’s good — unless it hurts too much.

“It is normal to have pain and soreness after exercise,” Higgins said. “Don’t run to take a painkiller, because that can mask pain and cause you to do real damage to your body. Let yourself recover naturally.”

 

Technology and health that you need to know

Nine hours per day — that’s how much time the average American spends in front of cell phone, tablet, computer or television screens. All that screen time is causing eye strain and other vision problems, according to a new report by the Vision Council, a nonprofit trade association.

Researchers surveyed more than 7,000 people and found that screen time is steadily increasing for kids and adults. Over the past year, the number of people who admitted spending 10 hours per day on electronic devices rose 4 percent.

“Nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults experience digital eye strain as a result of the growing use of these devices,” the researchers wrote in the report. “Adults aged 18 to 34 report feeling eye strain at a higher rate (45 percent) than their older counterparts.”

Constantly staring at a screen can lead to a host of problems, said Douglas Lazzaro, MD, professor and chairman in the Department of Ophthalmology at SUNY Downstate Hospital in Brooklyn, N.Y.

“The longer you look at a computer screen, the more eye strain you tend to have,which can cause headaches,” Dr. Lazzaro said. “We also tend to blink a lot less when we’re looking at a screen, and when we blink less, we dry out our eyes.”

This dryness can cause burning and itching, said Jacqueline Busingye, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and research has shown staring at screens can cause long-term vision problems.

“Some people believe that staring at a screen can change your vision and cause you to become more nearsighted. Its controversial, but some evidence has shown that to be the case,” Dr. Busignye said.

The typical kid growing up today gets more than 8 hours of daily screen time, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the number of hours will probably only increase as they get older. We are seeing the first ever generation of kids who have spent their entire lives staring at computer screens, Lazzaro said.

“We’re going to have a generation of people who are going to have all types of eye problems,” he predicted. “My nephew looks at an iPad or smartphone all the time, and he has constant headaches and dry eyes.”

So how do you fix the problem? It’s as simple as walking away, said Busignye.

“Taking a break and looking away and blinking a lot is important,” she said. “Walking away will give your eyes times to lubricate and adjust.”

A couple of computer tweaks can help too, according to Lazzaro said. “Increasing font size provides some benefit, so you’re not struggling to see the screen,” he said. “There are certain types of protection you can put on screens, such as filters, to cut down on glare, which can also help reduce eye strain.”

“But make you take a break for at least 10 minutes every hour,” he added. “It’s a simple and easy way to protect your eyesight.”

Family History of Disease So You Need To More Careful

unduhan-50Your family history of disease is your family medical tree. If you have a close relative with diabetes, your own diabetes risk may go up. Heart disease, cancer, and high blood pressure also tend to run in families, and some hereditary diseases can be passed down from parent to child through a defective gene.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, although most people realize that knowing their family history of disease is important, only about one-third of Americans have gathered and recorded their family’s health history.

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“Some examples of why family history is important and how doctors use it are colon and breast cancer,” says Elizabeth Lo, MD, a family care physician at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. “Someone with a strong family history of breast or colon cancer may be screened earlier and more frequently for these diseases.”

A family history of disease may be used to:

  • Determine your risk for certain diseases
  • Start early treatment or prevention for diseases that run in your family
  • Determine whether you should get certain genetic tests for hereditary diseases
  • Let you know if you are at risk for passing a disease to your children

“Family disease history may indicate the need for genetic testing and counseling,” says Dr. Lo. “A woman with a family history of breast cancer may be tested for certain genes that help doctors predict breast cancer risk and the best treatment.”

Creating Your Family Medical Tree

The National Institutes of Health recommends getting a family history of disease going back at least three generations. You should include your grandparents, parents, brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles, nieces and nephews, and cousins on both sides of your family. If you have children, include them, too.

“It is important to go back a few generations on both sides of the family because a young parent or even a young grandparent may not be old enough to have developed a potentially hereditary disease such as cancer or dementia yet,” explains Lo.

Your family historyof disease is influenced by a lot more than genes that may transmit hereditary diseases. Families also share other important factors such as lifestyles, diet, and environmental exposures that can cause a disease to run in your family. Common diseases to look for and chart include:

  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Stroke
  • Dementia
  • Mental illness
  • Osteoporosis

Some less common hereditary diseases include sickle-cell anemia, hemophilia, and cystic fibrosis.